Toktogul HPP rehabilitation (PHASE 3, 2016)

Kyrgyzstan

Energy

Signed Investment credit

On 27 July 2016, the EFSD Council approved the Kyrgyz Republic’s preliminary application and blueprint for the Toktogul HPP Rehabilitation (Phase 3) investment project worth US $40 million.

The project envisages the replacement of Units 1 and 3, including the replacement and repair of auxiliary systems and plant equipment, of the Toktogul HPP in the Kyrgyz Republic.

Toktogul HPP is the largest hydropower plant in the country and is part of the Toktogul cascade of hydroelectric power stations. . The total installed capacity is 1,200 MW (four units 300 MWeach). The power station produces 40% of electricity generated in the country and plays a critical role as a source of electricity for domestic consumption and exports. It is also acts as the frequency regulator for the Central Asian Unified Power System. Toktogul HPP has been in operation since 1975 and had no major rehabilitation or upgrades since then.

The Toktogul HPP Rehabilitation project comprises three phases:

  • Phase 1 is financed by the ADB and envisages the replacement of electrical equipment, including generator circuit-breakers, excitation and control systems and 500 kV transmission lines;
  • Phase 2 is co-financed by the EFSD and the ADB and envissages the replacement of Units 2 and 4, including the replacement and repair of auxiliary systems and plant equipment; and
  • Phase 3 envisages the replacement of Units 1 and 3, including the replacement and repair of auxiliary systems and plant equipment.

Expected project outcomes

Direct effects:

  • a 120 MW increase of the capacity of Toktogul HPP (the capacity of each unit to be increased by 60 MW);
  • enhanced generator performance due to the introduction of up-to-date technology;
  • improved safety and reliability;
  • lower repair and operational costs;
  • improved stability of the Kyrgyz Republic’s power system and ensuring stable voltage and frequency control in the Central Asian Unified Power System;
  • improved reliability and stability of power supplies to consumers and the population;
  • reduced winter energy deficit in the country; and
  • reduced environmental and man-caused risks associated with the deterioration of equipment.

Indirect effects:

  • enhanced trade with the EFSD member countries, including equipment and services supplies;
  • improved export potential due to the export of excessive electricity to the EFSD member states and improved balance of payments; and
  • improved economic security and independence from electricity imports.

Project documentation

Appraisal on Application

PDF, 2.46 Mb

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